Category Archives: Storm Water Management

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Low Salt Diet Recommended for Sidewalks

 

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LOW-SALT DIET RECOMMENDED!

For years, doctors have told people to stick to a low-salt diet. According to the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA), our waters should follow the same advice.  When snow and ice start to accumulate on Minnesota roads, parking lots and sidewalks, one of the most common reactions is to apply salt, which contains chloride, a water pollutant. When snow and ice melt, most of the salt goes with it, washing into our lakes, streams and rivers. Once in the water, there’s no way to remove the chloride, and it becomes a permanent pollutants.

There are many ways to reduce salt use while maintaining high safety standards:

  • unnamed-1More salt does not mean more melting.Use less than four pounds of salt per 1,000 square feet (an average parking space is about 150 square feet). One pound of salt is approximately a
    heaping 12-ounce coffee mug.
  • Shovel.The more snow and ice you remove manually, the less salt you will have to use and the more effective it can be. Break up ice with an ice scraper and decide whether application of a de-icer or sand is even necessary to maintain traction.
  • 15 degrees is too cold for most salt to work.Most salts stop working around this temperature. Instead, use sand for traction.
  • Sweep up extra salt.If salt or sand is visible on dry pavement, it is no longer doing any work and will be washed away.

Finally, consider changing the direction of your drain spouts so melting water doesn’t run onto walkways and driveways where ice can form.

 

July 2014 Newsletter

The latest  issue of Our Enduring Environs is now available.  In case you missed it, this issue is chock full of articles including volunteer opportunities and updated information about organics collection.  Check it out!

Alternatives to Salt Use for Icy Sidewalks and Driveways

Help keep leaves out of the street!

leafsignLynnhurst has a new environmental education initiative, using this yard sign to raise awareness of the important role that individuals play in helping to preserve our water quality. To learn more and how  you can help, click the link

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Many Lynnhurst Storm Drains Still Need Adoption

stormdrainAs fall approaches, it’s a great time to ADOPT A STORM DRAIN near your home. You can make a positive difference by removing leaves and other debris covering the drain (aka catch basin) and placing the leaves in your yard waste bags for collection as needed. Please place non-yard waste materials in recycling or the trash. Recruit your neighbors to work with you. This effort not only helps to preserve our local water quality, but can help prevent flooding at intersections. Please contact Becky at health4earth@gmail.com or 612-239-3208 to sign up. Thank you!

If you want to know where the runoff from the drain near your house goes, check out this catch basin map for Lynnhurst neighborhood.

Our Enduring Environs – February 2013 issue now available

The latest  issue of Our Enduring Environs is now available online.  It includes information on the March 23 Spring Forum on Trees and Invasive as well as announcements about Earth Day activities and ongoing neighborhood initiatives.

You should have received a printed copy in the mail the weekend of February 9.

Adopt a Storm Drain

You can make a positive difference by ADOPTING A STORM DRAIN
near your residence. It involves removing leaves and other debris
covering the drain and placing it in your yard waste bags for collection
as needed. Please place non-yard waste materials in recycling or the
trash. Maybe 3 or 4 of your neighbors could work with you? This
effort not only helps to improve our local water quality, but can help
prevent flooding at intersections.

Please contact Becky at health4earth@gmail.com or 612-239-3208 to sign up. Thank you.

UPDATE on the Storm Water Management Forum

UPDATE on the Storm Water Management Forum, Sat. Nov. 17, 9-10:30, Lynnhurst Community Center. Additional information will be provided by Mike Perniel, MPRB Water Quality Specialist, on the Lake Harriet diagnostic study/management plan currently underway with consultant Barr Engineering.

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Don’t Miss – LEC/LYNAS Fall Forum

Green Tip from Green Notes

 GREEN NOTES

Protect water quality by keeping leaves and grass clippings out of streets and storm drains

Grass clippings and leaves left in the street end up in storm sewers that flow directly into nearby lakes and streams. Clippings and leaves contain phosphorus and other nutrients that are significant sources of water pollution. The pollutants – especially phosphorus – can cause excess algae growth that negatively impacts other plants and wildlife, can be unsafe for pets and can degrade recreational opportunities.

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